Sydney follows Melbourne’s lead and gets green upgrade loans

Sydney follows Melbourne’s lead and gets green upgrade loans

Sydney office landlords will be encouraged to undertake more environmentally friendly office refits under a new “green loans” program.

The program is a joint initiative between the City of Sydney and independent government-backed consultants Low Carbon Australia Ltd (LCAL).

The ‘Environmental Upgrade Loan Scheme’ was actually first developed by City of Melbourne in September 2010 and now has live projects under-way.

http://www.propertyobserver.com.au/office/green-loans-on-offer-for-sydney-office-refurbishments/2012031553874

http://www.thefifthestate.com.au/archives/16137

Greenhouse by Joost pops up as part of MFWF

Greenhouse by Joost

To celebrate the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival’s 20th year, Greenhouse by Joost has popped-up on the banks of the Yarra River for 20 days from the 2nd March to the 21st March

The greenhouse is open daily from 8am for breakfast, and throughout the day for lunch, snacks and dinner – or drinks on the rooftop bar.

I attended last weekend and enjoyed, spiced chicken, quinoa, yoghurt and smokey eggplant dip, flat bread and grilled zucchini, pickled lemon, dil. The food and service was fantastic.

Greenhouse uses organic, biodynamic and local produce where possible. Herbs and weeds are grown on the rooftop and foraged locally. The beef comes from Hopkins River where all the cows live happy lives, as do the corn fed chooks they get from Glenloth Game. Joost has sourced the freshest local fruit and veg from select providers and uses green eggs. All the flour they use is stone milled in house from Powlett Hill wheat.

The design and architecture is eco-friendly and has been designed for disassembly, enabling the greenhouse to pop up at another location. With a number of shipping containers acting as structure, the toilets, kitchen and back of house areas are housed within these containers whilst the dining area is an open, airy and light filled space.

I love the façade which is made up of rusted f82 steel mesh (normally used in concreting) welded together which is then filled with potted strawberries to create a green wall against a ply backing.

FSC Ply is used extensively on the interior and recycled tube steel forms the chair and table legs, LED spot light fittings provide evening light, not required during the day due to large clear window panels.

For further insights and information please check out…

http://byjoost.com/greenhouse/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greenhouse-by-Joost/105493049526332

State of the Climate 2012

State of the Climate 2012

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The long-term warming trend has not changed.
Guillaume Brialon

Australia’s land and oceans have continued to warm in response to rising CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels.

This is the headline finding in the State of the Climate 2012, an updated summary of Australia’s long term climate trends released by CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology today (14 March 2012).

The long-term warming trend has not changed.

Each decade has been warmer than the previous decade since the 1950s. Global-average surface temperatures were the warmest on record in 2010 (slightly higher than 2005 and 1998). 2011 was the world’s 11th warmest year and the warmest year on record during a La Niña event. The world’s 13 warmest years on record have all occurred in the past 15 years.

On land around Australia the observed warming trends are consistent with the global-scale warming – despite 2010 and 2011 being the coolest years recorded in Australia since 2001.

In the oceans around Australia, sea-surface temperatures have increased faster than the global average, and sea-level rise since 1993 is greater than, or equal to, the global average.

Australian average temperatures over land

Australian annual-average daily mean temperatures showed little change from 1910 to 1950 but have progressively warmed since, increasing by 0.9 °C from 1910 to 2011. The average temperature during the past ten years has been more than 0.5 °C warmer than the World Meteorological Organization’s standard 1961-1990 long-term average. This increase continues the trend since the 1950s of each decade being warmer than the previous.

The warming trend has occurred against a backdrop of natural, year-to-year climate variability. Most notably, El Niño and La Niña events during the past century have continued to produce the hot droughts and cooler wet periods for which Australia is well known. 2010 and 2011, for example, were the coolest years recorded since 2001 due to two consecutive La Niña events.

Changes in average temperature for Australia for each year (orange line) and each decade (grey boxes), and 11-year average (black line – an 11-year period is the standard used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change). Anomalies are the departure from the 1961-1990 average climatological period. The average value for the most recent 10-year period (2002–2011) is shown in darker grey.
Bureau of Meteorology
Click to enlarge

Oceans

Rising sea level

Global-average mean sea level for 2011 was 210 mm (± 30 mm) above the level in 1880. The observed global-average mean sea-level rise since 1990 is near the high end of projections from the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment Report.

Rates of sea-level rise are not uniform around the globe and vary from year to year. Since 1993, the rates of sea-level rise to the north and northwest of Australia have been 7 to 11 mm per year, two to three times the global average, and rates of sea-level rise on the central east and southern coasts of the continent are mostly similar to the global average. These variations are at least in part a result of natural variability of the climate system.

High-quality global sea-level measurements have been available from satellite altimetry since the start of 1993 (red line), in addition to the longer-term records from tide gauges (blue line, with shading providing an indication of the accuracy of the estimate). Sea level rose at a global-averaged rate of about 3 mm per year between 1993 and 2011, and 1.7 mm per year during the 20th century as a whole. CSIRO
Click to enlarge

The rate of sea-level rise around Australia as measured by coastal tide gauges (circles) and satellite observations (contours) from January 1993 to September 2011. CSIRO
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Increasing sea-surface temperatures

Sea-surface temperatures in the Australian region in 2010 were the highest on record, with nine of the months during 2011 ranked in the top ten warmest months on record. Sea-surface temperatures averaged over the decades since 1900 have increased for every decade. Terrestrial and ocean surface temperatures have shown very similar warming trends over the last century.

The warm sea-surface temperatures in 2010-11 were strongly influenced by La Niña. Ocean temperatures around Australia were warmer during 2010-11 than for any previously identified La Niña event, likely due to the influence of the long-term warming trend of the past century.

Greenhouse gases

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions account for about 60% of the effect from anthropogenic greenhouse gases on the earth’s energy balance over the past 250 years. These global CO2 emissions are mostly from fossil fuels (more than 85%), land use change, mainly associated with tropical deforestation (less than 10%), and cement production and other industrial processes (about 4%). Australia contributes about 1.3% of the global CO2 emissions. Energy generation continues to climb and is dominated by fossil fuels – suggesting emissions will grow for some time yet.

CO2 levels are rising in the atmosphere and ocean.

About 50% of the amount of CO2 emitted from fossil fuels, industry, and changes in land-use, stays in the atmosphere. The remainder is taken up by the ocean and land vegetation, in roughly equal parts.

The extra carbon dioxide absorbed by the oceans is estimated to have caused about a 30% increase in the level of ocean acidity since pre-industrial times.

The sources of the CO2 increase in the atmosphere can be identified from studies of the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 and from oxygen (O2) concentration trends in the atmosphere. The observed trends in the isotopic (13C, 14C) composition of CO2 in the atmosphere and the decrease in the concentration of atmospheric O2 confirm that the dominant cause of the observed CO2 increase is the combustion of fossil fuels.

Measurements from Cape Grim, Tasmania, showing: increasing monthly-mean, background concentrations of CO2 (parts per million,top) showing that the CO2 growth rate has increased above the linear trend (dashed line) through the measurement period; the decreasing ratio of 13CO2/12CO2 in the atmosphere (expressed as δ13CO2 in units of per mille, centre); and decreasing concentration of oxygen in the atmosphere (expressed as the ratio of oxygen to nitrogen, bottom), including measurements at Cape Grim from both CSIRO (light green) and Scripps Institution of Oceanography (dark green). CSIRO
Click to enlarge

Future changes

Australian average temperatures are projected to rise by 0.6 to 1.5 °C by 2030 when compared with the climate of 1980 to 1999. The warming is projected to be in the range of 1.0 to 5.0 °C by 2070 if global greenhouse gas emissions are within the range of projected future emission scenarios considered by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. These changes will be felt through an increase in the number of hot days and warm nights, and a decline in cool days and cold nights.

Climate models suggest long-term drying over southern areas during winter and over southern and eastern areas during spring. This will be superimposed on large natural variability, so wet years are likely to become less frequent and dry years more frequent. Droughts are expected to become more frequent in southern Australia; however, periods of heavy rainfall are still likely to occur.

Models generally indicate an increase in rainfall near the equator globally, but the direction of projected changes to average rainfall over northern Australia is unclear as there is a lack of consensus among the models.

For Australia as a whole, an increase in the number of dry days is expected, but it is also likely that rainfall will be heavier during wet periods.

It is likely (with more than 66% probability) that there will be fewer tropical cyclones in the Australian region, on average, but the proportion of intense cyclones is expected to increase.

CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology will continue to provide observations, projections, research, and analysis so that Australia’s responses are underpinned by science of the highest quality.

A list of peer-reviewed references underpinning State of the Climate 2012 can be found on the CSIRO website.

This article was originally published at The Conversation.
Read the original article.

Protecting Orangutans and their habitat is a global responsibility

Rasa Ria Nature Interpretation Centre (NIC) – Sabah

Introduction

The Orangutan is a highly endangered species of great ape whose existence is threatened by wanton habitat destruction through logging and forest fires.

They are 97% human like.

The prime reason for logging the natural habitat is to enable the planting of Palm oil plantations, which oil product is used in many everyday items such as some noodles and chocolate. This action causes many Orangutans to be displaced, orphaned and hunters unfortunately also target this magnificent and very intelligent animal.

Under the watchful eye of the Sabah Wildlife Department, the young orphaned Orangutans are taken to the Rasa Ria Nature reserve and are undergoing the first stage of rehabilitation.

Over a period of 3-5 years they are being prepared for the second stage of rehabilitation at the Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre in Sepilok, Sandakan. This centre is the biggest of it’s kind in the world.

Once the two phases of rehabilitation are completed, the orangutans will then be carefully guided back to their natural habitats in the wild.

Rasa Ria encourages visits to the Sepilok Orangutan Rehabilitation Centre where large adult orangutans, both male and female, are frequently sighted. They hope the visits to Rasa Ria and Sepilok will raise appreciation towards Sabah’s immense efforts in protecting these wonderful animals.

Touring the Nature Interpretation Centre

Upon arrival at the NIC, we are seated and the famous documentary, Man of the Forest, part of the Orangutan UK Appeal, is shown. The 20min doco gives viewers a detailed insight into the challenges faced by the orangutan and the great work carried out by Sepilok Rehabilitation Centre, which is giving the Orangutan a ray of hope.

Following a tour of the NIC facility we then commence our 1-hour trek deep into the jungle to catch a glimpse of some of the reserves latest arrivals.

As we climb steeply up a narrow track we see a raised timber deck, a feeding station, connected by a series of ropes crossing the jungle canopy.

As young orangutans do not yet have the ability to source their own food, rangers provide regular meals to the young orangutans via the feed stations.

While we are standing on the deck, more than five baby orangutans come swinging through the jungle, across the canopy above our heads, they are fast, funny and do look like old men.

We are lucky they feel safe enough to come very close to us, the ranger advises that in the reserve we do not touch the orangutans, just being close is a special feeling. They stay for about 30 mins and then slowly swing away, disappearing into he jungle.

Continuing along the path we trek for another 30-45 mins traversing along a 40mt high canopy walkway seeking out other local flora and fauna. We came across Monkey’s, turtles and many types of butterflies.

Rasa Ria and the local rangers’ fantastic efforts in educating visitors and protecting and rescuing displaced orangutans is world known, their commitment, passion and continuing efforts are giving the orangutans of Borneo a ray of hope.

In Australia and across the world many organizations are also assisting the orangutan’s plight.

Studio Green provides sponsorship support to Katie, Wulan, Cinta and Ten Ten through the Rasa Ria NIC.

Images are available via here

Please see the below links for ways you can add your support.

http://www.zoo.org.au/Borneo

http://www.zoo.org.au/PalmOil

http://www.orangutan-appeal.org.uk/

 

Inaugural Green Build Asia 2012 – Kuala Lumpur

Inaugural Green Build Asia 2012

On February 14 2012 Geoff Gourley attended the Inaugural Green Build Asia conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia as part of his 2012 Malaysian eco educational tour.

Held in conjunction with International Construction Week at KLCC, opposite the famous Petronas Towers, Green Build Asia was one of South East Asia’s largest green building conferences; well attend by more than 10,000 various corporations, governments and individuals from across the Asia pacific region it was the place to catch up on green building, innovation, new products and services.

Opened by YAB Dato’ Sri Najib Razak, Prime Minister of Malaysia, a focus of this year’s event was on technology, systems, materials and suppliers and strongly featured low carbon cities and sustainable and green buildings, with over 250 exhibitors covering more than 6,000sqm.

I was lucky enough to spend some time chatting to a representative from Malaysia Ministry of Works (JKR) and Ahmad Zaki Resources, one of KL’s largest builders, who are currently undertaking the KKR2 tower, targeting a LEED Platinum environmental rating, KKR2 (RM309 Million) will house Malaysia Ministry of Works and be one of Malaysia’s greenest buildings setting an exmplar for other future buildings.

KKR2 is strategically located along Jalan Sultan Salahuddin, KL and is a 37-storey office tower standing 210mt tall and is the first phase of a complex development.

I was also privileged to see the building site up close; construction is approximately 90% complete and well on target for its scheduled May 2012 completion date.

The remainder of the conference presented a large exhibition of various green building products and suppliers, renewable energy, water and waste solutions and a number of guest speakers presented their views on the sector.

Putrajaya – a Low Carbon Green City was a unique initiative of the Malaysian government and had a huge stand, complete with extensive models, toward the front of the main conference hall.

All in all it was a good opportunity to see what another country, less developed in green building, was undertaking and it was very encouraging to hear about a number of carbon neutral residential and commercial developments are in planning and a couple actually under construction.

For further information see links below and for images see flickr link on home page.

www.ppj.gov.my

www.pjh.com.my

www.gdparchitects.com/projects/current/kkr-tower

http://www.greenbuildasia.org/

Experiencing Gayana Eco Resort – Sabah

Borneo and Sabah

Borneo is South East Asia’s biggest island and is collectively made up of the two East Malaysian states of Sabah and Sarawak. The island of Palau and Gaya is located just off Sabah’s Capital, Kota Kinabalu, about a 2.5-hour flight from Kuala Lumpur.

Gaya Island is the largest of the five islands that make up the Tunku Abdul Rahman National Marine Park and is famous for its ancient, dense Dipterocarp forest which offers a rare glimpse into a primordial jungle

Gayana Eco Resort

Departing from Jesselton Point Ferry Terminal on the edge of Kota Kinabalu, we take a tender to the Gayana Eco resort, about a 25 minute trip sees us arrive to a small jetty at the base of a stunning jungle backdrop.

Stepping onto the jetty you are greeted with hundreds of tropical fish swimming beneath you in the crystal clear aqua waters, to the right a number of Kingfish that have been rescued from old nets swim freely in a protected rehabilitation area.

The Eco resort itself sits right against the jungle and rocky outcrops of National Park of Tunku Abdul Rahman, a number of over water villas house guests and have been designed to enhance the soothing sounds of the ocean below and the jungle beside, while capturing the enduring vistas of Mt Kinabalu on the distant horizon.

One of the main features at Gayana is the Marine Ecology Research Centre or (MERC). The centre is a must visit and showcases the product of their research and conservation program efforts. Passionately propagating endangered Giant Clams and restoring vital natural coral reefs; a place where visitors can actively participate in restoring vibrant life back to once damaged ocean floors.

Striking the perfect balance of forward thinking ecology and visitor comfort Gayana is a place your body and mind will enjoy.

The rest of day one was taken up with an immersion in the MERC facility. The guide directed visitors to the, quite modern, theatrette complete with advanced audiovisuals and tiered seating for approximately 80.

A 20 min presentation soon followed which gave a detailed insight in to MERC and the great work that has been under way for a number of years. After the presentation visitors stroll along the over-water jetty to an educational aquarium, housed in more than 20 tanks visitors get up, close and personal with the local fish species, Giant Clams and our guide facilitates an informative discussion about the centre, the habitat and how climate change and human impact has placed this area at risk.

Next to the aquarium is a more ‘touch and feel’ area, stroking star fish, baby clams, sea cucumbers, coral and the like gives visitors an appreciation for how precious and vulnerable the marine habitat is. MERC is all about conservation through education, which is why it hosts many school groups and visitors from across Malaysia, Brunei, and Borneo and across the globe.

Adjacent to MERC’s main facility an in-ocean protected area and home to numbers of rescued marine life. A green and olive turtle were rescued overnight, found stressed and tangled in a disused Fishermans nets, bought to MERC by a local, the centre assesses and nurtures the turtles back to health before releasing back into the marine reserve. Along side the turtles are a number of kingfish, which had been also rescued by locals and are being cared for by the centre.

In addition to the conservation of fish, mammals and Giant Clams the centre is also developing and restoring coral reefs through initiatives like replanting of broken and damaged coral and the establishment of two solar powered bio rock reefs. Placing large steel structures in areas of the habitat where reefs have been lost forms a Bio rock reef; by directing a very low voltage current through the steel it encourages and attracts rapid coral growth.

One of the best ways to explore the marine reserve is via kayak and snorkeling or free diving which visitors are encouraged to undertake.

Very early morning on day two at Gayana gave rise to the sounds of monkeys clambering down to the rocky ocean edge at low tide to fossick for breakfast, more than 30 were busy feasting on crabs, baby clams anything they could find, or steal from each other.

Later that day as I walked along the jetty, just below a monitor lizard appeared from the jungle, at more than 1.5 meters long, it slowly slide into the water every so smoothly swimming around, glad it did not find me enticing. Looking above, a few rare Hornbills flew in formation, a fantastic sight to see.

As the sun sets on my last day here I was lucky enough to see a mass bait ball swimming very close to the jetty, thousands of young fish darting left, right, up and down, they clearly like being in a protected marine reserve also.

To see more images from the trip please see flickr link on the home page.

Informative sites

www.gayana-eco-resort.com

www.sabahtourism.com

From Emerald Green to Murky Brown

 

 

From Emerald Green to Murky Brown

Ensuring green data centres stay green after completion…

Technology advancements in Green Data centres are now becoming the industry standard across the globe, ensuring that data centres maintain green credentials and ongoing green performance ‘Service Management’ solutions provide post completion processes needed to remain green.

Once you open the doors to the emerald green data centre and allow people access, it can quickly become murky brown again.

Organisations make substantial investments in establishing green data centres. You may not be the size of Google, who invested $890 million in its data centre infrastructure in the first three months of 2011, but I would suggest you could be looking a multi-million dollar investment over a period of time. You don’t want to be held responsible for that investment going to waste.

 

The current position

The below outlines where you may currently be…

You have consolidated and automated and virtualised and de- duplicated and contained and coupled.

You have obtained an above average PUE, DCiE. WUE, ERE, CUE and DCcE.1

You are compliant with EPEAT and RoHS and WEEE2 directives. You are rapidly moving up the Data Centre Maturity Model.3

You have reduced costs and carbon emissions significantly.

The CEO, CFO, CIO and CMO all love you. Your data centre is a bright and shiny emerald green.

Whether this reflects your reality or it is a state to which you are aspiring, the questions green data centre owners and operators need to ask are:

  • When I reach the ideal state, how am I going to keep it that way?
  • How am I going to ensure that the organisation recognises the return on all that investment and hard work?
  • How am I going to stop my emerald green hue turning into one that is murky brown?

Why should you ask those questions? Because – your challenge is people!

 

Processes and procedures for people

The key is to have good processes and procedures for people to follow that will support all the technology solutions that you have adopted. The solution lies in Service Management. It has all the processes you need to protect your investment and enable your continual journey towards improved sustainability.

The Service Management lifecycle from Service Strategy through Service Design through Service Transition and Service Operation through to retirement of services contains all the processes you need to keep your green data centre bright and shiny.

The following are just some examples…

Service Strategy includes the process of Service Portfolio Management. Service Portfolio Management through the activities of “define, assess, approve and charter” should ensure that there is no duplication of services and associated applications. The introduction of new services that could have been supported by a change to existing application(s) rather than creation of new ones will only serve to unnecessarily increase the carbon footprint of the data centre.

Back in 2009, Intel announced that over the preceding 2 years they had reduced their applications by 37% towards their goal of 50%. They expected that retiring applications would result in a net present value of more than USD $50 million. Consider the associated reduction in carbon emissions through the release of infrastructure that was required to support the unnecessary 50%.

When designing services within Service Design every consideration should be given to reducing the environmental impact of the service. This should include developing software in a way that can be used for long periods of time without becoming outdated; developing applications that will run in the most effective and efficient manner; developing services with the lowest possible hardware requirements. Poorly designed services will increase the carbon footprint of your data centre unnecessarily.

As well as the obvious candidate in support of sustainability – Capacity Management, Availability Management, IT Service Continuity Management and Service Level Management are key processes. These processes should ensure that the availability requirements of the business for their services are appropriate to the value and priority of that service to the business. There is an environmental (as well as financial cost) in the provision of high levels of resilience, storage and contingency. If it is not required, don’t provide it in your data centre.

Service Asset and Configuration Management (SACM) within Service

Transition is a key player in keeping your data centre green. If you haven’t already done so, a first step towards your green data centre is to do a complete inventory of servers, software and applications, including the interdependencies between them all via SACM. You need to firstly understand how each physical and virtual server is used, what software is running on it, which business applications it supports and what its actual value is to the business. Then you can work out what to remove, refresh or virtualise unused, unnecessary and inefficient assets.

Once you have done this you need to keep a track of what is in your data centre and how it is being used, so regular audits through SACM are crucial. Comatosed equipment will start to pop up as developers decommission applications without the associated removal of redundant hardware. SACM will ensure that this is detected and remedial action can be taken.

Back in 2009, Sun Microsystems undertook a clean-up of data centre facilities at four of their major campuses and pulled out over 440 pallets of equipment. There were 6,199 devices in total with 4,100 of them being servers. 64% of those servers were still powered on and consuming energy around the clock. Sun equated the environmental impact of this to puling 6000 cars off the road.

You don’t want to have to do this to your emerald green data centre a few years down the track just because of a lack of a good SACM process!

Change Management of course is key in ensuring that every change is considered for its environmental impact and that redundant equipment resulting from the change is identified (in conjunction with SACM and Release and Deployment Management) so that it can be removed in a timely manner.

Change Management should ensure that Requests for Change (RFCs) are accepted or rejected using a rationale that includes the environmental impact of that change as well as the financial, business and technology impacts.

The rationale can include environmental requirements such as:

  • the use of suppliers of products and services with environmental and sustainability management systems and ISO 140001 accreditation;
  • the utilisation of devices that conform to a specified energy rating;
  • the use of devices that have a lifetime energy footprint within specified parameters;
  • the identification and removal of redundant components – infrastructure and applications – and their reuse, recycling or environmentally responsible disposal;
  • sustainable release and deployment methods including remote access and local distribution;
  • the inclusion of environmental targets within SLAs, OLAs and UCs; and
  • adherence to the organisation’s sustainability policy, objectives and targets.

All of this will contribute to keeping the data centre green.

In Service Operation, Event Management should be used to detect deviation from the expected environmental performance of the data centre and ensure that Incidents are created and directed to the most appropriate resource to undertaken investigation and diagnosis as soon as possible. Corrective action can then be taken to get the data centre back to its emerald green status.

Where Incidents related to deviation from expected environmental data centre performance is repeatedly occurring, Problem Management should be used to determine root cause and eliminate it.

Continual Service Improvement contains the processes that enable the data centre and facilities team to look at ways in which the sustainability of the data centre can be continual improved and become an even brighter green. Service Measurement and Service Reporting will be imperatives in keeping a handle on current performance against targets and determining where improvements can be made.

Service Management is the data centre or facilities manager’s friend. The effective implementation of the aforementioned processes and the others within Service Management will result in the protection of the data centre from undesirable activity that starts the journey from emerald green to murky brown.

I have only mentioned a few of the Service Management processes in this article but for more information see below link.

Macanta has developed the eco-ITSM service, which uncovers the sustainability aspect of every process, function and activity within service management. More information is available from www.eco-itsm.com or www.macanta.com.au

Thanks and acknowledgement to Karen Ferris – Director, Macanta Consulting

1  PUE    =    Power        Usage    Effectiveness,    DCiE   =   Data   Centre   Infrastructure    Efficiency,    WUE    =   Water  Usage  Effectiveness,    ERE   =   Energy  Reuse  Effectiveness,    CUE    =  Carbon    Usage  Effectiveness,  DCcE  =  Data  Centre  Compute  Efficiency  

2  EPEAT  =  Electronic  Product  Environmental  Assessment  Tool,  RoHS  =  Reduction    in    hazardous    Substances,    WEEE   =   Waste   Electrical    and   Electronic    Equipment  

3

http://www.thegreengrid.org/Global/Content/Tools/DataCenterMaturityModel.aspx

Green building and eco educational trip to Malaysia 2012

Green building and eco educational trip to Malaysia 2012

Geoff will be undertaking a 10 day Green building and Eco Educational trip to Malaysia in mid February 2012.

The start of the trip includes  touring the latest green buildings of Kuala Lumpur including attendance at Green Build Asia 2012

Green Build Asia 2012

Asia’s No.1 Event on Sustainable Building, Design & Construction

The world of sustainable building, design and construction will converge in Kuala Lumpur for Green Build Asia 2012 Exhibition & Conference. Held at the Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre (KLCC).

The event is expected to be attended by over 10,000 delegates and trade buyers from across the region to get updated on the latest in property, building design, materials, construction equipment and interiors. Hosted by the Construction Industry Development Board, Malaysia, the event is Asia’s No.1 Business-to-Business Event devoted to Green Building.

Days 3-10 will be spent visiting the Sepilok Orang-utan Rehabilitation Centre, Gayana Eco resort and the UNESCO listed Kinabalu Park.

Sepilok Orang-utan Rehabilitation Centre

The Sepilok Orang-utan Rehabilitation Centre was set up in 1964 to rehabilitate orphaned baby orang-utan. Set in the lush 4,300-hectare Kabili-Sepilok Forest Reserve.

The Centre under the administration of the Wildlife Department of Sabah attracts tourists and researchers alike, giving them the opportunity to watch the orang-utan up close in their natural habitat.

A boardwalk leads to a viewing area and feeding platform where the apes are fed milk and bananas twice a day by rangers. Feeding time also attracts long-tailed macaques to the area.

While orang-utan rehabilitation is still the primary goal at Sepilok, it also focuses on public education on conservation, research and assistance on other endangered species such as the rhinoceros.

Gayana Eco resort

Gayana Eco Resort rests serenely at the edges of a lush jungle forest on a coral reef island off the coast of Borneo. 52 over water, tropical villas are architecturally designed to enhance the soothing sounds of the surf below while capturing the enduring vistas of Mt. Kinabalu on the distant horizon.

At its heart, the resort is about protecting and re-generating our precious Marine Ecology, and the only such property to feature its own, on-site Marine Ecology Research Centre passionately propagating endangered Giant Clams and restoring natural coral reefs; where guests actively participate in restoring vibrant life back to once damaged ocean floors.

Kinabalu Park

Kinabalu Park was gazetted as the first State Park in Sabah in 1964 and declared Malaysia’s first World Heritage Site by UNESCO in the year 2000 for its outstanding biological attributes.

Also the Centre of Plant Diversity for South East Asia, the Park boasts more than 5,000 vascular plant species, an estimated 1,000 orchid species, 621 fern species, nine Nepenthes species, 29 Rhododendron species and two Rafflesia species.

The Park has no shortage of fauna as well, being home to some 90 lowland mammal species, 22 montane mammal species, 21 bat species, 326 bird species, 62 toad and frog species and a large population of the 850 butterfly species that occur in Sabah.

Out of the 29 bird species that are endemic to Borneo, at least 17 are confined to the mountains, notably Mount Kinabalu. These include subspecies of the Red breasted Tree-partridge, Crimson-headed Wood-partridge and Mountain Blackbird.

Such diversity is truly the makings of a naturalists’ paradise!

Introducing Studio Green – Cool and Green

Introducing Studio Green follow link to read about studio green and how Shape Our Future is powering sustainable projects and initiatives.

We are currently seeking content, advertisers and sponsors for our upcoming digital editions versions.

email studiogreenteam@gmail.com for more details or to make submissions.

#studiogreen #in

Portsea Polo 2012 had a touch of ‘Green’

Cool Australia Green Room at the Portsea Polo

A warm Saturday in early January 2012 saw the annual Portsea Polo get a ‘touch of green’ through the addition of Cool Australias ‘Green Room’ marquee thanks to Jason Kimberley, Deb Hallmark and the team at coolaustralia.org

With more than 4000 at the polo, just 180 guests were able to enjoy the eco friendly, sustainable marquee where we drank champagne from recycled jars, through biodegradable straws, whilst sitting on hay bales surrounded by walls of potted strawberries and wooden crates filled with  herbs, fruits and vegatables.

Contributions made by Joost design and  food by Damm Fine Foods and with the best field side position we enjoyed the polo matches whilst making a worthy contribution to the Cool Australia Not-for-Profit organisation.

As the day drew to a close guests grabbed their potted strawberry plant, said goodbyes to new friends and headed off. A great day was had by all and I am sure future polo events will also get a ‘touch of green’.

Geoff Gourley Founder Shape Our Future and Jason Kimberley Founder Cool Australia

 
 

The Green Room

About Cool Australia

Cool Australia is your one-stop info-shop for all things environmental, inspirational, practical and sustainable. Full of facts, they are the eco-link between science and our community, businesses and schools.

Cool Australia explains global warming and environmental issues in plain English. They promote the great green stories happening in Australia and help you to find out the challenges we face and what people are doing to get us back on track.

Australian’s are embracing a low-impact lifestyle because it is the smart, cool and healthy way to live. It makes us feel connected to our neighbours, family and friends. If we work together we can build a city that is cleaner, fairer, safer and happier.