Become a Sustainbaility Change Maker – Applications now open!

Dont just sit there! Become a ‘sustainability change maker’ and lead the change to a sustainable future.

Applications are now open for the CSL 2011 Fellowship Program.

I completed this scholarship based fellowship in 2008 and wholly endorse the programme run by Centre for Sustainability Leadership.

Find out more by visiting http://www.csl.org.au. Applications close on 27th March.

If you would like to personally discuss my experiences with this program please contact me on +61428 317 387 or email geoffgourley@bigpond.com

http://issuu.com/sustainabilityleadership/docs/2011_fellowship_program_webb

Help save our environment

We urgently need you to help Shape Our Future…

Shape Our Future is currently preparing proposals for an exciting sustainability based project partnering with Local Councils to enhance environmental sustainability and adapt to climate change.

The Victorian Local Sustainability Accord is offering councils $A6.7 million in grants to partner with organisations.

Due to an increase in opportunity Shape Our Future urgently needs assistance from 2-3 motivated volunteers to help complete our submissions by 21st December 2010.

If you would like to help this worthwhile cause and be involved in an exciting sustainability project please contact Executive Director and Founder – Geoff Gourley on 0428 317 387 or email geoffgourley@bigpond.com http://www.shapeourfuture.org.au

CEO – Centre for Sustainability Leadership

Are you up for an exciting career challenge?
Could you be the CEO we are searching for?

The Centre for Sustainability Leadership is searching for a CEO to consolidate our amazing achievements to date and to take the Centre to new heights.

We will actively consider candidates of all ages, and especially CSL Alumni, who have demonstrated clear leadership ability and are looking to grow into a CEO role.

See the position description for details.

If this opportunity is not for you – perhaps you know the perfect candidate? Please pass on to your networks.

Please contact me on 0488 031 896 or ceo.applications@csl.org.au to discuss further.

Geoff Gourley selected to the Property Council of Australia’s Sustainable Development Committee

Property Council of Australia’s Sustainable Development Committee

Having completed a two year tenure on the Property Council of Australia’s Future Directions Committee Geoff has been selected to the PCA Sustainable Development Committee due to his extensive experience in property sector, passion for sustainability and knowledge of ‘greening’ the built environment.

This is a great opportunity for ISIS to build on their reputation as an industry and sustainability leader through Geoff’s involvement, which is in line with ISIS goal to improve financial performance through sustainable growth.

Read the article about the New Victorian Sustainable Development Committee.

Climate Leadership

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Climate leadership

I want to share an example of climate leadership that helps make the case for a bold and fair treaty from the Copenhagen climate talks next month. Last year Johson Diversey joined WWF’s Climate Savers by making a commitment to directly reduce its greenhouse emissions by 8% by 2013, against 2003 levels.

Due to investment, research, planning and because their employees rallied around the cause, the company was able to announce that it will triple its absolute emissions reductions commitment to 25% over the same period. Climate Savers is a World Wildlife Fund program comprising 22 leading corporations that have made exact commitments to reducing their greenhouse gas emissions.

Over the past ten years, Climate Savers companies have prevented the emission of 50 million tons of CO2, the equivalent of Switzerland’s annual emissions. If a multinational corporation like JD can achieve this, imagine what will happen if all of us triple our commitment. Different ways to do this—for businesses, individuals, families and students— are listed at http://www.bit.ly/JDaction (click on the banner at the top). Climate Savers companies have shown that absolute greenhouse gas emission reductions do not impede business growth.

Environment versus economy is no longer a justifiable argument. Saving the planet can make good business sense—even in the short term: for a $12 million investment in emissions reductions, JohnsonDiversey will reap $32 million in cost savings.

There are two messages associated with this development: – The bottom line and tackling climate change can go hand in hand – We need a bold and fair climate change agreement out of Copenhagen To help share these messages, we have created an Electronic Press Kit, which includes embeddable banners, videos, MP3 files and other digital assets, at: http://www.bit.ly/JDaction .

The Press Kit also contains a copy of this year’s Green Building Market and Impact Report by Rob Watson, “father” of the LEED green building standard. This report was released during a Webinar with Johnson Diversey President & CEO Ed Lonergan. Please feel free to use and distribute this content and links freely, including posting it to any of your websites.

Let The Clean Economy Begin The Let The Clean Economy Begin campaign unites Climate Savers companies with a common message that it is possible to grow business while reducing carbon emissions. These companies are calling on both their peers and political decision makers to make the changes necessary to move the world toward a clean economy; and for COP15 to deliver an ambitious, fair and effective agreement to cut global greenhouse gas emissions.

An introductory video can be found in our EPK at: http://www.bit.ly/JDaction . The world’s leading companies are saying to world leaders, We are implementing changes—now it’s your turn. It’s time to exhibit true climate leadership in ushering in a new era of possibilities. The future is calling.

Defining Sustanability Leadership Article

CSL Alumni 2008

Defining Sustainability Leadership

Firstly let’s define ‘Sustainability’, there are a number of common principles which are embedded in most definitions of sustainability, these are…

The conservation of biodiversity and ecological integrity.
Constant natural capital and sustainable income.
Ensuring intRAgenerational (within generations) and intERgenerational (across generations) equity.
It is recognising and responding to global circumstances at a local level
It is dealing cautiously with risk, uncertainty and irreversibility
It is ensuring appropriate valuation of environmental assets
It is integration of environmental, social and economic goals in policies and
it is the activities, social equity, community engagement and participation which deliver results.

Sustainability Leadership is about creating a collaborative learning environment to motivate, empower and educate the community who, with new skills and understanding and by applying the above principals, will lead business and community into a sustainable future. We face a global climate crisis, more than ever before, we need innovative and immediate change in paradigms to unlock sustainability as a pathway for future generations.

Global and local communities need leaders to outline and vision a future, we need to consider and value our environment as an integral part of any sustainable society. Leadership in sustainability can make this a reality, by developing and delivering sustainability leadership programs to a range of individuals we will ensure our circle of influence is great and lasting.

We are aware of the urgent need to address climate change, carbon emissions, water, energy, biodiversity and environmental challenges, through a range of programs and initiatives it is possible for sustainability leaders to vision and influence a sustainable future and assist with the shaping of a sustainable planet.

By taking a leadership philosophy we are able to connect people from diverse backgrounds, whether from developing communities or already developed societies we need to engage and re-connect them to the natural environment, through sustainability leadership we can have a lasting impact on behaviors, mind sets and long term actions which can lead to more sustainable habits.

Last year I successfully completed a Fellowship in Sustainability Leadership, a program which was delivered by Centre for Sustainability Leadership, founded by the 2008 Environment Minister’s Young Environmentalist of the Year Award recipient Larissa Brown. This program gave me the tools to influence and inspire others; there are many more graduates that have gone on to become the leaders they imagined, however, we need more inspired leaders.

Inspired leadership is evident, yet, it is not evident everywhere, a positive approach is to develop inspired sustainability leadership within every part of society, every community, every sector, every country. It is my belief leaders are not born but they are identified, developed and made.

A good leader knows when it is time to change shape because they are highly attentive to those around them. Coming from a position of strength, a great leader takes risks by freeing up the creative genius in their followers to build their capability and multiply the talents of the community. This leads to a sense of community and to greatness.

It is true that inspired leaders share a number of qualities. Some of which are… Integrity, the ability to be courageous, having a social conscious, being able to understand others, facilitating cooperation, identifying and fostering innovation, ensuring collaboration amongst organisations and individuals, being creative, caring and maintaining a sense of humor.

We need Inspiring, venturous leadership to connect caring communities, caring people to begin influencing cultural, behavioral and attitudinal changes at a local level. Sustainability Leadership is needed across all sectors of business and in all types of communities, urban, regional, outback, beachside, farming, high country every corner of Australia needs leaders who are visionaries, leaders who care, leaders who can act, leaders that understand, leaders who make changes and leaders who want to shape our future.

Engaging with the community

Community engagement is certainly not new; in my research it is clear many of our best leaders have fantastic, all encompassing community engagement strategies, principles, goals and commitments. How leaders engage with their local community with regard to sustainability, environment, planning and emissions reductions is an interesting discussion point.

I believe most future sustainability leaders already know how to effectively engage with their community, in fact, for some people, that what they do best, consider those people you know who seem to know everyone and everyone knows them, then consider diving a bit deeper and ask yourself the following questions…

At what level do sustainability leaders engage with the community and what real results have been achieved?

Has the community’s youth been fully engaged or has the focus been around political and business leaders?

Focusing on the second point put yourself in Gen Ys’ shoes; there are plenty of unknowns, lots of things are changing around them, and they are neither fully aware of the rationale – nor in control of – those things changing. Even in times of more positive change, the first to buy-in are those who either, control and direct the change, or are experiencing change that is positive to them personally.

Remember? Our youth are trying to perform, succeed, and persevere – they deserve our respect. Those who aren’t? Well, now’s a good time for a change – it has never been more important than during challenging social, environmental and economic times.

We all need to pull our weight – the quicker we can get youth engaged as future sustainability leaders the faster we will become sustainable communities and a sustainable race? Now is the time to find out more, time to stand up and become a leader of your own future and in the process you can shape the future of humanity.

Article: Sustainability Leadership
Date: 20 August 2009
Author: Geoffrey Gourley
Publication: Victorian Association for Environmental Education (VAEE)

Keynote Speech National Camps Conference

Keynote speech delivered at National Camps Conference 2009

Good evening and thank you for attending the National Camps Conference here at Kindilan Outdoor Education and Conference Centre.

I arrived in Brisbane this morning to beautiful blue skies and a warming sun, I decided to go for a walk and explore the CBD and river area. I came across the Brisbane Botanical Gardens and lied on the soft grass, surrounded by native tropical trees and plants for a couple of hours enjoying the sun, the smells and sounds of the natural environment; and would like to share a thought I had while reflecting…

Make me a bird so I can fly away; take me to my sanctuary, my place of peace, my harmony.

Let me lose myself to the simple thoughts running through my head, it seems so right here.

I wish 1000 wishes that everyday could be the same. Today is my day to dream of blue skies. 

I think we could all afford a little time to reconnect with our environment.

For years now society has tried to get people in positions of power to care that has not worked; now we are going to get people who care into positions of influence.

We need strong, venturous leadership, we need people who will lead, develop and influence our communities and business toward sustainable future prosperity

The Australian Camps Sector, I believe, are just the passionate and caring people that we need to deliver real action and systemic change.

Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world, indeed it is the only thing that ever has. Margaret Mead made that statement which rings true to the challenges we currently face.

Sustainability Leadership is about creating a collaborative learning environment to motivate, empower and educate the future leaders who, with these new skills and understanding will lead us to a sustainable future.

Socially, economically, environmentally and culturally we determine what our environment and planet looks like, what the world sees, how we want to live and what future we leave for generations to come.

I recently attended dinner with Hon Al Gore, as part of the Climate Project Asia Pacific Summit, Mr Gore delivered a motivational speech, in which he called on us as a society and as a sustainability leaders to “find the moral courage to rise to the challenge” we don’t want future generations to say “what were you thinking?, didn’t you care”

We need innovative and immediate change to unlock sustainability as a pathway for future generations.

Camps can be at the leading edge of innovation in youth leadership, regional and community development, camps have the ability to quickly respond to community and market demands and through partnerships we understand we can cause a greater change to society and the environment.

Can we be the future shapers of Australia…Yes we can.

Thank you. Please enjoy the rest of the evening and the remainder of the National Camps Conference.

Dinner with Al Gore

Dinner with Al Gore

Sunday 12 July 2009 – The Great Hall – NGV

Hosted by
- Australian Conservation Foundation
- The Climate Project

I was privileged to attend an intimate dinner with Al Gore which was held during his recent visit to Melbourne as part of the Asia Pacific Climate Summit.

Seated with Senator Christine Milne – Greens Tasmania, Danny Vadasz – ACF and a number of other fascinating guests we heard Al Gore talk about the Asia Pacific Summit and training he is delivering to 300 participants from across 19 countries including China, Singapore, New Zealand, Fiji and Indonesia.

This is the first time people from the Asia-Pacific region have been brought together to be trained by the Honourable Al Gore.

The summit enables them to communicate directly with their communities about generating a combined effort to insist, as a region, on the best possible outcomes at Copenhagen.

The trainees represent a diverse group including diplomats, doctors, chief executives, students, economists, school principals, a fruit grower, a fire-fighter, climate relief workers and an associate professor of philosophy.

One in 75 Australians have now seen a presentation delivered by the 250 Al Gore-trained Climate Project Presenters working throughout communities in Australia.

“This really is the time to build a groundswell of public support in favour of strong action at Copenhagen,” said Don Henry, Executive Director of the Australian Conservation Foundation, which is helping to organise the training sessions.

The evening was thoroughly enjoyable with roving performers greeting guests upon their arrival, before we moved into the great hall, with its illuminated coloured glass ceiling, to enjoy dinner and conversation.

A set of 3 songs was performed by Katie Noonan, accompanied by a string quartet and guitarist. Climate Project ambassadors, Merrick and Rosso, provided their own unique presentation on the event and climate change which included a short spin around the gallery on a fold up bike.

A number of items were donated and auctioned to raise funds for ACF Copenhagen campaign featuring an $8,000 Intrepid overseas travel voucher, Akubra hat signed by Al Gore and many other great gifts.

As the evening drew to a close we walked away with an inspired and motivated vision to keep promoting and communicating the outcomes we seek to achieve in Copenhagen during December 2009.

Exciting Sustainability Internship Opportunity

Exciting Sustainability Internship Opportunity

Are you keen to gain experience in the sustainability field?

Want to be part of ethical, sustainability based projects and developments?

Looking for a flexible internship where you will learn and develop skills?

Want to be part of a growing not-for-profit and help shape our future?

Would you like to make a real difference, gain invaluable experience and meet likeminded people in the process? This is your opportunity.

Geoff Gourley is one of Australia’s leading social entrepreneurs and sustainability leaders. His progressive not-for-profit, Shape our Future, is leading the way by developing innovative projects aimed at creating and shaping a sustainable future.

Geoff is currently on the look out for students or post graduates from a range of backgrounds such as education, environmental science, business, law, information technology, communications, and marketing to take on flexible internships from July to September 2009 and October to December 2009.

 

Projects proposed to be undertaken during the 2009 / 2010 Internship Program:

• Development of an Eco Retreat and land & habitat regeneration program

• Sustainability Community Centre business model

• Sustainability Education program for Youth

• Regional Sustainability Festival

• Documentary tracking selected projects

• On line web 2.0 Sustainable Business and Carbon Emission Reduction Program

 

Benefits of joining the ‘Shape Our Future’ 2009 / 2010 Internship Program include:

• Application of knowledge to real projects that will make a real difference in sustainability, environment and community

• Mentoring from skilled professionals in the field

• Meeting and working with like-minded people

• Opportunities for growth and learning new skills

• Experience to add to your resume

• Flexible days/hours

 

Shape our Future is looking for:

Enthusiastic, committed individuals with a passion for sustainability, and well developed verbal and written communication skills. Applicants must be able to use their initiative, and work well both independently and as part of a team.

 

Time commitment 2009

First round of internships start at the beginning of July 2009 to be completed by the end of

September 2009 with a second round starting October 2009 to be completed prior to Christmas December 2009.

Internships work hours are flexible but as a guide, 10am-6pm four days a week.

Interns must commit to attending the entire 3 month period of the internship. Options exist to follow into the second round internship but this is not mandatory.

 

Applications

Important Dates

Applications close: 5pm 12 June 2009.

Interviews will be held on: 22 June 2009.

Successful applicants will be notified on: 29 June 2009.

To apply please email geoffgourley@bigpond.com with;

• A letter outlining your interest in the internship, your ability to contribute to the project(s) and which project(s) you are interested in taking part in;

• Your CV;

• A ‘PDF’ copy of a recent academic assignment or project;

• The names and contact details of two referees.

 

Alternately applications may be sent to;

Geoffrey Gourley

Founder

Shape Our Future

Po Box 2247

Oakleigh VIC 3166

Sustainable Councils Keynote Presentation 2009

Article:             Sustainable Councils Conference 2009 – presentation notes
Date:                  7 May 2009
Author:          Geoffrey Gourley
Additional:  Presentation

1.         Introduction

Thank you.

I would like to acknowledge the Wurundjeri people who are the Traditional Owners of this land. I would also like to pay respect to the Elders both past and present of the KULIN Nation and extend that respect to other Aboriginals present.

Following on from Alan Pears, and as your last presenter it is my hope you leave here today with new found strategies, improved understanding, positive and motivated attitudes that lead contribute to the development of Sustainable Councils.  And I have some home work for you.

As one of Australia’s Sustainability Leaders I have been invited to speak to you to this afternoon about a number of topics directly related to local councils.

Rather than take off my watch and, in less than 20 Mins, try to cover exhaustive topics around local councils and sustainability, I have decided to give you all a reprieve… from my  environmentalist, futurist and sometime out there rants on the sustainable prosperity of  mothership earth and how globally, we are out of control.

However, I will be presenting a brief outline of 3 key elements which are essential if local councils are to not only meet but exceed the sustainability expectations, targets and principles of the 21st century.

The key elements are…

  • Sustainability Innovation
  • Inspired Leadership
  • Community Engagement

These elements are focussed around achieving real action.

2.         Lets take a minute to dive into Sustaina-what ?

A number of common principles are embedded in most definitions of sustainability:

These are

  • The conservation of biodiversity and ecological integrity
  • constant natural capital and sustainable income
  • ensuring intRAgenerational (within generations) and intERgenerational (across generations) equity
  • It is       recognising and responding to global circumstances at a local level
  • It is       dealing cautiously with risk, uncertainty and irreversibility
  • It is       ensuring appropriate valuation of environmental assets
  • It is       integration of environmental, social and economic goals in policies and
  • it is       the activities, social equity, community engagement and participation which deliver results.

-End Section-

3.        Sustainability Innovation

Innovation has, for a long time, been a part of the Australian culture, Well before Federation in 1901, Australians demonstrated how innovative they were.

Thousands of years ago, Indigenous Australians developed tools like fish traps, boomerangs and woomeras to assist with hunting. They lived in harmony with nature using the native flora and fauna as a source of food and medicine.

1901: Federation Wheat

William Farrer released the Federation wheat strain, resistant to fungal rust disease and drought.

1928: Speedo Swimwear (great if you are an Olympic swimmer)

This swimwear originated in Sydney when the MacRae Knitting Mills manufactured the company’s first swimsuit, the razorback, made from silk and joined in the middle of the back. Speedo introduced the world’s first nylon swimsuit in 1957.

1953: Solar Water Heater

The first prototype of a solar water heater was developed at CSIRO in Victoria.

1979: Race Cam

A lightweight, fixed camera used in car racing and other sports broadcasts was developed by Australian engineer, Geoff Healey.

1985: World’s Most Efficient Solar Cells

Dr Stuart Wenham and Professor Martin Green from the University of New South Wales produced the world’s first 20% efficient solar cell.

2000: Biodegradable Packaging

The Cooperative Research Centre for International Food Manufacture and Packaging Science developed new biodegradable packaging materials based on starch.

What is Innovation?

An innovation can be big or small. Brand-new or just a bit different, it doesn’t matter. An innovation can be clearly complex or seemingly simple. Innovations are often thought of in terms of technical achievement, but can also be a design.

The presence of a genius can help with innovation – it may speed up the end result by having a person who can see and make the future happen. However, innovation is more than the work of any one “Einstein.” Innovation involves the taking of the work of an individual (or team) and taking it to a broader audience.

The future of many organisations depends upon their ability to innovate. Competition is fierce. Knowledge spreads quickly. The ability of an organisation to not only keep up with its current practices, but to exceed its own – and its peers – expectations are critical to success.

What Is “Real” Innovation?

“Real” Innovation does not happen haphazardly or sporadically within organizations. “Real” Innovation is accomplished consistently and systematically, given the true need and a process for delivering solutions.

Organisations that innovate successfully do so using an efficient and repeatable methodology. Success is not dependent upon genius – it emerges from the disciplined application of a proven innovation methodology.

Homework

1.         Identify areas where you can apply sustainability innovation in your local council

Have a Sustainability Management Plan for now and the future

Offer an Eco Centre for community and business development

Understand current environmental performance and future goals

Share innovations with other council

-End Section-

4.         Inspired Leadership

Last year I successfully completed a Fellowship in Sustainability Leadership, a program which was delivered by the 2008 Environment Minister’s Young Environmentalist of the Year Award recipient Larissa Brown. 

Inspired leadership is evident, yet, it is not evident everywhere, a positive approach is to develop inspired sustainability leadership within local councils.

It is my belief leaders are not born but they are identified, developed and made.

A good leader knows when it is time to change shape because they are highly attentive to those around them. Coming from a position of strength, a great leader takes risks by freeing up the creative genius in their followers to build their capability and multiply the talents of the organisation. This leads to community and greatness.

It is true that inspired leaders share a number of qualities…

Some of which are…

Integrity

Courageous

Conscious

Understanding

Cooperation

Innovation

Collaboration

Consistent

Creative

Caring

Capable

Sense of humour

 

  • Model integrity, what does integrity look like to you?
  • Cooperate with the best in your people
  • Foster a collaborative working environment
  • Unleash team capability by empowerment through equality in responsibility and authority
  • Be conscious and present with your team
  • Encourage creativity with brainstorming
  • Work with your team to bring innovation and best practices to your organisation
  • Balance caring in the choices you make that effect your organisation
  • Embracing paradigm shifts through courage and continually advance your corporate vision
  • Remain consistent in demonstrating principles of leadership you wish others to emulate.
  • Balance understanding with expectations on deadlines when the circumstances dictate
  • Laugh at yourself and laugh freely and openly with your leadership team?

We need Inspiring, venturous leadership to connect caring communities, caring

people to begin influencing cultural, behavioral and attitudinal changes at local council level.

Leadership is needed across all sectors of business and in all types of communities, urban, regional, outback, beachside, farming, high country every corner of Australia needs leaders who are visionaries, leaders who care, leaders who can act, leaders that understand, leaders who make changes and leaders who want to shape our future.

I call them ‘Inspired Vision Leaders’

Your homework

1.         Identify and develop your inspired vision leaders.

-End Section-

5.         Community Engagement

Community engagement is certainly not new; in my research leading up to today it is clear many local councils have fantastic, all encompassing community engagement strategies, principles, goals, commitments and programs, it must be true it’s on their web sites.

I then considered how local councils were engaging with their local community with regard to sustainability, environment, planning and emissions reductions.

Nope, no alarm bells ringing here either pretty much the same lots of positive information being generated and communicated with the words sustainability, environment emissions reduction.

The findings have lead me to believe local councils already know how to effectively engage with the community, in fact in some councils that what they do best, but I then considered diving a bit deeper and asked myself the following questions.

  • At what level does local council engage with the community and what real results have been achieved?
  • Has the community’s youth been fully engaged or has the focus been around ratepayers and business?

Lets consider the first question with a positive approach ‘how better can local council engage with community’ around sustainability.

Communities need Eco Centres, that is a specific facility people can visit to gain information, talk with local experts, attend workshops, get an insight into the Whys and Hows of sustainable practices. This is more than just handing out low flow shower heads; it is about educating people about sustainable living practices and changing their behaviours and setting new paradigms around sustainable communities.

You have heard it before but the built environment contributes greatly to global carbon emissions, through effective community engagement local councils have the opportunity to change this. A community eco centre can be a hub for sustainability, a demonstration of green building and ESD principals, a community garden, the people behind it can be inspired leaders of the community effecting a major shift toward a sustainable culture.

Now the second point I wish to focus on is the engagement of the communities’ youth, Remember - you were young once.

Put yourself in Gen Ys’ shoes; this is uncomfortable I know, and there are plenty of unknowns. Lots of things are changing around them, and they are neither fully aware of the rationale - nor in control of - those things changing.

Even in times of more positive change, the first to buy in are those who either:

  1.  
    1. Control / direct the change, or
    2. Are experiencing change that is positive to them personally

Cut them a break – you’re not always easy to live with either.

Remember? Our youth are trying to perform, succeed, and persevere – they deserve our respect.

Those who aren’t? Well, now’s a good time for a change – it has never been more important than during challenging social, environmental and economic times. We all need to pull our weight – the quicker we can get youth who care into positions of influence the faster we will become sustainable communities?

Your homework

1.         Engage with all members of the community and at all levels and achieve real results.

6.         Closing

In closing I would like to recap your homework requirements, remember your local community will be checking your performance.

1.         Identify areas where you can apply sustainability innovation in your local council

Develop an efficient and repeatable methodology and create a culture of innovation. Remember an organisations ability to exceed its own – and its peers – expectations are critical to success.

2.         Identify and develop your inspired vision leaders.

We need Inspiring, venturous leadership to connect caring communities, caring

people to begin influencing cultural, behavioral and attitudinal changes at local council level.

3.        Engage with all members of the community, at all levels and achieve real results.

Review your community engagement plan and ensure sustainability initiatives, principals and goals have been included and ensure your strategies are designed to deliver real results.  Build a community Eco Centre become a leading local council.

That concludes my presentation, I would like to thank you for your time and please enjoy the remainder of the conference.

-End Section-

-End Presentation-
-Q&A-
*References were used in researching this presentation.